Risk Management

The Intersection of Workers’ Compensation Immunity and Contractual Indemnity

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The workers’ compensation statute in many states provides that the workers’ compensation benefits received by an injured employee is the employee’s exclusive remedy.  The benefits are paid based on a no-fault basis and the injured employee is barred from bringing a lawsuit against his or her employer.  The degree in which the exclusive remedy provision applies varies in different jurisdictions.  An ABA 50-State Survey on the exclusive remedy provisions can be found by clicking HERE.

In many construction contracts, a contractor indemnifies an owner for personal injury and property damage caused by the contractor’s negligence.

Here is the fact scenario:  A contractor’s employee gets injured on a jobsite.  The employee receives workers’ compensation benefits but has incurred additional damages beyond those benefits.  The contractor employee cannot bring a lawsuit against the his employer based on the workers’ compensation exclusive remedy provision, but the employee may bring a lawsuit against the owner for the personal injury damages.  Owner

An Investigation in Sheep’s Clothing: Multilateral Development Bank “Audits”

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Enforcement actions against international construction companies have been on the rise in recent years, culminating in the headline-grabbing $3.5 billion joint U.S./Brazilian action against Odebrecht S.A. in late December 2016.  Less prominently, however, enforcement actions against construction companies by the multilateral development banks (“MDBs” – such as the World Bank and the European Bank for Reconstruction and Development) have also risen sharply, and in many cases have been putting companies out of business.  Here are some basics you should know in case you ever get a letter from an MDB saying you are about to be “audited.” 

It’s Not an Audit
The letter a company will receive launching this kind of investigation will usually say that the integrity office (as the enforcement arms are generally known) is conducting an “audit” of a particular project.  This is unlike any audit you have ever experienced – because it is actually a full-blown investigation that in many ways resembles an investigation by

Additional Insurance Coverage: Fundamentals and Misconceptions

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Additional insured (“AI”) requirements for commercial general liability (CGL) policies are very common in construction contracts.  An Owner routinely requires its general contractor (“GC”) to provide AI coverage for itself, its affiliates, and sometimes a handful of other entities (lender, architect, etc.).  In turn, the GC mandates its subcontractors to provide AI coverage for the GC, the Owner, and a cast of other characters.  While frequently used, for good reason, this risk transfer tool is often misunderstood.  In this post, I will explain the purpose of AI coverage, identify what it does and does not cover, and provide answers to a few misconceptions about additional insured coverage.

The Purpose of Additional Insured Coverage

The design of AI coverage is to trigger the insurance procured by lower-tier contractors.  The Owner, GC, and subcontractors all have CGL insurance, but the goal of additional insured coverage is to make sure that someone else’s insurer will be on the hook to provide defense and indemnity should